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Commentary: Italian populists are falling into line with EU on trade
EU FTAs & bilateral ties EU trade latest Free comment Investment

Commentary: Italian populists are falling into line with EU on trade

Early fears that Italy’s populist government would block the EU’s trade agreement with Canada have proven unwarranted. Despite Trump-style rhetoric and ‘Italy first’ approaches, the populist government in Rome seems to have fallen in line with other EU governments on trade since taking power six months ago. The government is split …

Southworth: Bring overseas countries into the British post-Brexit trade conversation
Brexit comment Free comment UK WTO & 3rd countries UK-EU negotiations

Southworth: Bring overseas countries into the British post-Brexit trade conversation

Chris Southworth, secretary general of the International Chamber of Commerce United Kingdom, shares his views with Borderlex’s Iana Dreyer on Britain’s prospects as a trading nation after Brexit. On the menu: the UK in the World Trade Organization in the Trump era, rolling over 40 existing EU trade agreements with …

Brazilian elections: What impact on Mercosur talks with EU?
EU FTAs & bilateral ties EU trade latest Free comment Investment Mercosur

Brazilian elections: What impact on Mercosur talks with EU?

Emily Rees assesses the impact of this Sunday’s Brazilian presidential election on European investments in Latin America’s largest economy and what sort of role the new administration will likely play in helping to secure a trade agreement with the EU. In an exceedingly polarised political climate, Brazilians are expected to …

China and the EU: The contradictions of exercising joint trade leadership
China EU trade latest Free comment WTO & Plurilaterals

China and the EU: The contradictions of exercising joint trade leadership

The EU and China know they must work together to show leadership in matters of global trade and investment. But realising effective cooperation with trade partners to make the system more robust and to withstand the “disruptive bilateralism originating from Washington” is easier said than done, argues Jacques Pelkmans.